News

Diabetes Australia Research Trust supports groundbreaking vitamin C research

A new study from Deakin University, and supported by the Diabetes Australia Research Trust, has found that taking 500mg of vitamin C twice daily can help those with type 2 diabetes by lowering elevated blood sugar levels across the day and minimising spikes in blood sugar after meals.

The randomised cross-over study, recently published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, also found vitamin C lowered blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes, suggesting benefits for heart health too.

Diabetes Australia supporting research into the causes of type 1 diabetes

With the support of a grant from the Diabetes Australia Research Trust, Dr Andrew Sutherland from St Vincent’s Institute Medical Research is studying a new way of potentially preventing and treating type 1 diabetes.

“There are a class of immune cells, Th17, that can play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes so we want to identify the molecules these cells produce. This could pave the way for the development of new therapies,” Dr Sutherland said.

Finding better ways to detect kidney disease

Diabetes is a complex condition that can cause damage to a range of essential organs. That’s why Diabetes Australia is committed to funding important research projects examining every facet of the condition and its impact on people’s health.

For instance we’ve provided funding, through the Diabetes Australia Research Trust, to support Associate Professor Elif Ekinci from the University of Melbourne and her research into kidney disease which could lead to earlier detection.

Diabetes Australia welcomes confirmed funding for new Glucose Monitoring technologies in MYEFO

Diabetes Australia has welcomed the inclusion of $243.5 million over four years from 2018-19 (and $84.1 million per year ongoing) to support people with diabetes and the expansion of access to new glucose monitoring technologies.

Diabetes Australia CEO Professor Greg Johnson said it was very pleasing that the continuous glucose monitoring program, first announced in 2016 and extended recently by the Government, will form part of the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) from 1 January 2019.

of 40